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Saturday, August 27, 2005

Drugging Our Soldiers with Ecstasy


American soldiers traumatized by fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan are to be offered the drug ecstasy to help free them of flashbacks and recurring nightmares? The US Food and Drug Administration has given the go-ahead for the soldiers to be included in an experiment to see if MDMA, the active ingredient in ecstasy, can treat post-traumatic stress disorder. The last thing our troops need is ecstasy. http://www.drug-rehab.us

Our soldiers, our sons, dughters, mothers and fathers, put their lives on the line and come back to drug pushers. While their phobias are no doubt real and of concern to them, there are better ways to handle this sort of thing. Drugging is not one of them. http://www.drugaddictiontreatment.ca/

Scientists behind the study in South Carolina think the feelings of emotional closeness reported by those taking the drug could help the soldiers talk about their experiences to therapists. Several victims of rape and sexual abuse with post-traumatic stress disorder, for whom existing treatments are ineffective, have been given MDMA since the research began last year. http://www.DrugAddictionHelpline.com/

Michael Mithoefer, the psychiatrist leading the trial, neglects to mention how ecstasy turns them into vegetables or how people have died from just one dose. http://www.DrugAddictionHelpline.com/

The psychiatric industry is working real hard to get ecstasy approved for medical use. It seems that the psychiatrist and his pseudo science have found yet another area of society where he can create drug addiction.


In the early 1970's ecstasy (MDMA) was actually used by therapists to assist in marriage counseling. That was until the government classified it as an illegal substance in the 80's.The South Carolina study marks a resurgence of interest in the use of controlled psychedelic and hallucinogenic drugs.

Several studies in the US are planned or are under way to investigate whether MDMA, LSD and psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, can treat conditions ranging from obsessive compulsive disorder to anxiety in terminal cancer patients.

While we are all going about our daily lives, with our own individual worries and battles, an entire war is being waged against our society, right before our noses, and it’s being played out in the psychiatric arena.

We need to reach the children of today before they fall prey to vested interests who do nothing but profit from their legal drug pushing. If we act now, those future soldiers will be better equipped to handle the real battlefield--their home territory. http://www.drugaddictiontreatment.ca/

Help educate the minds of our future leaders and goal makers. We need to work together to create a drug-free society. http://www.drugaddictiontreatment.ca/

For help with overcoming drug or alcohol addiction or to request drug education personnel to your school or group, go to;


http://www.DrugAddictionHelpline.com/

http://AddictionHelpRehab.blogspot.com/

http://www.DrugAddictionSolutions.com/

http://www.drugaddictiontreatment.ca/

http://www.drug-rehab.us

http://www.addiction-rehab-success.com/

Thursday, August 25, 2005

September is The National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month -- Re-Educating Society About Drugs

In order to prevent other "Vested Interests" from re-educating our youth to use drugs safely, we need to speed up our progress. To do that we have set a new target to get materials sent to 20,000 more schools this next year. For help with overcoming drug and alcohol addiction or to request drug education personnel to your school or group, go to; www.DrugAddictionHelpLine.com.

There is a new form of education sweeping our public school system in America. In earlier days we saw the implementation of the "Good Drugs, Bad Drugs" theory. This approach, by the way, is still prevalent in today's teachings about drugs within the public school systems. But there is a new kid in town! (Or the old kids with a new face maybe?)

They are called the "Drug Policy Alliance." Here is a quote from theirwebsite: "Drug education efforts should promote safety first." So, ask yourself, what is wrong with that statement? You should know that this organization is spreading its brochures and materials to schools all across the USA. Recently, while doing some live presentations, we found some of their brochures in the school. When we approached the supervisor in the school and asked why they had this stuff displayed there. The supervisor was dumb founded and did not realize they were even in the school. This organization's philosophy has come to be known as "HARM MINIMIZATION.

"This organization, which no doubt has many vested interest supporters, is actually promoting that we must teach kids to use drugs safely. Their attitude is "Kids are going to use anyway," so let’s make sure they do it safely. Read those sentences again. Make no mistake, their brochures and website look very official and it all sounds good at a glance. However, in the end they are treading dangerous waters. How can a society possibly condone teaching kids how to safely use drugs? Well, most people will not agree that this is good. In fact, in the example above, the teacher did not believe in that theory.However, just like anything, with enough money behind your movement a lot of progress can be made.

Just look at the broad abuse of Ritalin in our public school system! Teaching kids the truth about drugs is the only way to ensure they make the right decision. As you can see time is not on our side. If we are going to succeed at reaching every kid in our schools, we need to step up the volume and fast.In the last year alone our video products have reached over 1.3 million students in public schools across all 50 States in America. Yet there are more than 50 million school-aged kids in the USA alone.

The way we reached these students was through gracious sponsorship of schools from our donors. You can sponsor schools in your state and Friends of Narconon will get an entire Educator's Kit right to those schools. Currently we are in just over 5,000 public schools and about 100 private schools. That is, teachers from these schools registered with Friends of Narconon and were sent materials that had been donated.

In order to prevent other "Vested Interests" from re-educating our youth to use drugs safely, we need to speed up our progress. To do that we have set a new target to get materials sent to 20,000 more schools this next year.For help with overcoming drug and alcohol addiction or to request drug education personnel to your school or group, go to; www.DrugAddictionHelpLine.com.

Tuesday, August 23, 2005

Drug Addiction -- Adolescent Alcohol Abuse, 10.4 Million Drinkers


Year after year, more money is spent promoting the use of alcohol than that of any other product. Perhaps through its elaborate and creative marketing, the most basic, yet important fact about alcohol is often overlooked — alcohol is a drug — the most commonly used and widely abused drug in the world.

According to the most recent national Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA), there were 10.4 million drinkers ages 12 to 20 in 1998. Of these, 5.1 million were binge drinkers, meaning that they drank five or more drinks on at least one occasion in the month before the survey. Two million were heavy drinkers, binge drinking at least five times that month.

The average age when youth first try alcohol is 11 years for boys and 13 years for girls. According to research by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, adolescents who begin drinking before age 15 are four times more likely to develop alcohol dependence than those who begin drinking at age 21.

“Generally, an adolescent’s risk for alcohol dependence at some point in life decreases by 14 percent with each additional year that drinking is delayed”, states Joanna Young of DrugAddictionHelpLine.com.Data from National Household Survey on Drug Abuse indicates that while 915,000 youth ages 12 to 20 reported alcohol dependence in the past year, only 16 percent of them (148,000) received treatment.

Several large-scale school surveys suggest that 4 to 20 percent of teenagers have either a current or past history of alcohol abuse or alcohol dependence. For help with overcoming addiction or to request drug education personnel to your school or group go to; www.DrugAddictionHelpLine.com

September is Drug Addiction Recovery Month - Why Kids Take Drugs

www.DrugAddictionHelpLine.com

As our kids grow up and spend less time with us because of academic or sports activities, concerts and parties, they are introduced to newsituations that not only seem promising but are in fact dangerous.”A recent survey of parents revealed that their biggest concern with regards to kids taking drugs was their ‘health’ (not dying or addiction)”, said Joanna Young of DrugAddictionHelpLine.com.

"Why are kids turning to drugs at an alarming rate?"When asked what parents felt they could do to help keep their kids from taking drugs; they said "better parenting," "close relationships," "spending more time with their kids." Some of us may think it is the "parents' fault." Others can blame the schools for not doing their job.

Where did all this drug use come from? How did this attitude towards taking drugs change over the last 200 years? Think about it. Did we have Prozac 200 years ago? How did we, as a society, deal with "depression" back then? More importantly, how has an entire population mind-set changed from hardly any knowledge of or need of drugs, to one that tends to rely on drugs for a quick fix?

As we all know drugs are an international epidemic. While there are many reasons for this the one thing that we can all do is get more educated and ensure that our kids are informed. For help with overcoming drug or alcohol addiction or to request drug education personnel to your school or group, go to www.DrugAddictionHelpLine.com

Monday, August 22, 2005

September is The National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month


Addiction destroys countless lives, shatters families, and threatens the safety of our neighborhoods. “Drug and alcohol abuse destroys the hopes of men, women, and young people and takes a terrible toll on society”, said Joanna Young of www.DrugAddictionHelpLine.com.

National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month provides an important opportunity to promote the values that have given people the strength to beat drug and alcohol abuse and remain drug-free. This year's theme is, Join the Voices of Recovery: A Call to Action; emphasizes the critical role of communities in encouraging individuals with substance abuse problems to seek help. While those who suffer from addiction must help themselves, it is also crucial for family, and friends, to support those fighting to overcome substance abuse as well as becoming more educated on preventive measures.

Those in recovery have always played a key role in helping others achieve healthy lives. They can convey important information about the toll of alcohol and drug addiction and the benefits of recovery, inspire others to succeed, and allow young people to learn valuable lessons about their experiences.

We encourage individuals to take an active role in advocating for making community treatment centers and recovery services an integral part of the public health.

Staying clean and sober is a lifelong responsibility, and those who succeed improve their health, can better enjoy their family and friends, and are more likely to find success in the workplace. We celebrate the success of those in recovery, but we must help those still suffering from dependence and battling addiction.

We must continue the fight against alcohol abuse and the toll it takes on our society. Together, we can achieve these goals, help save lives, and restore hope to individuals and families. For help with overcoming drug and alcohol addiction or to request drug education personnel to your school or group go to; www.DrugAddictionHelpLine.com

Thursday, August 18, 2005

September is Drug Addiction Recovery Month

www.DrugAddictionHelpLine.com

Across the nation, plans are well under way for the 16th annual National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month (September), started and sponsored by the federal government's Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services (SAMHSA) organization. According to SAMHSA, this year's theme is "Join the Voices for Recovery: Healing Lives, Families, and Communities," which celebrates the positive impact of treating alcohol and drug use in communities.

In the year 2000, drug abuse cost American society an estimated $160 billion. More important were the concrete losses that are imperfectly symbolized by those billions of dollars—the destruction of lives, the damage of addiction, fatalities from car accidents, illness, and lost opportunities and dreams. Drug abuse drives some of America’s most costly social problems—including domestic violence, child abuse, chronic mental illness, the spread of AIDS, and homelessness.

Drug treatment costs, hospitalization for long-term drug-related disease, and treatment of the consequences of family violence burden our already strapped health care system. In 2000, there were more than 600,000 hospital emergency department drug episodes in the United States. Health care costs for drug abuse alone were about $15 billion. SAMHSA reports that there are over 22 million Americans in need of treatment for a drug or alcohol problem.

Recovery Month builds awareness among individuals, organizations, schools, and communities that alcohol and drug addiction can be overcome. For help with overcoming addiction or to request drug education personnel to your school or group, go to www.DrugAddictionHelpLine.com

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